designed-for-life

designed-for-life:

diy colour block clock

Like me are you in need of a quick DIY to spruce up that bare wall in your home office or room? I came across this diy clock by Molly from Almost Makes Perfect, and love the concept. I am a huge fan of colour blocking, and while you can be as wild with colours as you wish, this is a good example of a minimal blocking where texture plays a part. Personally I like the clean and simplistic option of the bare clock face and single colour against the beautiful wood grain.

Materials

• A clock kit (purchase here:)

• Wood clock base

• Acrylic paint of your choice

• Painters tape

not pictured :

• A small paint brush

• A pencil

• Sand paper

• Anything with a circular shape to trace around

Directions

Step 1: Sand your clock to get a smooth finish, then tape off half the wood with your painters tape and burnish it by smoothing with your nails.

Step 2: Using anything that has a round shape and is smaller than your clock, trace around the shape for a semi – circle, think pot lids (Molly used an old trash bin that was sized just right).

Step 3: Mix your paint with water so it’s more of a wash rather than a thick layer of paint.

Step 4: Paint the center and then carefully free hand around your circular shape. Make sure you dont have much paint on the brush when you do the edges or it’ll bleed.

Step 5: Once your paint is dry, slowly remove the tape and assemble your clock kit as instructed.

Wouldn’t these make great holiday gifts?

designed-for-life

designed-for-life:

diy colour block clock

Like me are you in need of a quick DIY to spruce up that bare wall in your home office or room? I came across this diy clock by Molly from Almost Makes Perfect, and love the concept. I am a huge fan of colour blocking, and while you can be as wild with colours as you wish, this is a good example of a minimal blocking where texture plays a part. Personally I like the clean and simplistic option of the bare clock face and single colour against the beautiful wood grain.

Materials

• A clock kit (purchase here:)

• Wood clock base

• Acrylic paint of your choice

• Painters tape

not pictured :

• A small paint brush

• A pencil

• Sand paper

• Anything with a circular shape to trace around

Directions

Step 1: Sand your clock to get a smooth finish, then tape off half the wood with your painters tape and burnish it by smoothing with your nails.

Step 2: Using anything that has a round shape and is smaller than your clock, trace around the shape for a semi – circle, think pot lids (Molly used an old trash bin that was sized just right).

Step 3: Mix your paint with water so it’s more of a wash rather than a thick layer of paint.

Step 4: Paint the center and then carefully free hand around your circular shape. Make sure you dont have much paint on the brush when you do the edges or it’ll bleed.

Step 5: Once your paint is dry, slowly remove the tape and assemble your clock kit as instructed.

Wouldn’t these make great holiday gifts?

schriftarchitekt

mitarbeiter:

Freitagsfundstücke: Fernweh

kleiner-wiener-auf-reisen – das erklärt sich von selbst. Hier findet ihr viele schöne Schnappschüsse aus verschiedenen Ecken, wie oben aus dem polnischen Breslau.

Poetrygarden auf Reise – hier berichtet eine Bloggerin von ihrer 18-monatigen Abenteuerreise durch Australien, Neuseeland, Indonesien, Indien, wo sie im November die Ausbildung zur Yogalehrerin erwartet, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Kambodscha, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapur und die Philippinen (uff, Neid!).

Und dann hätten wir noch die Berichte von Greta auf Reisen, die bereits seit Ende 2010 regelmäßig bloggt.

Fotos: kleiner-wiener-auf-reisen

architectureofdoom

archatlas:

Long Museum (West Bund) Atelier Deshaus

"The new design adopts the cantilever structure featuring “vault-umbrella” with independent walls while the shear walls with free layout are embedded into the original basement so as to be concreted with the original framework structure. With the shear walls, the first underground floor of the original parking has been transformed to an exhibition space with the overground space highlighting multiple orientations because of the relative connection of the “vault-umbrella” at different directions; besides, the electrical & mechanical system has been integrated in the “vault-umbrella” structure. As to the overground space covered by the “vault-umbrella”, the walls and the ceiling feature as-cast-finish concrete surface so that their geometrical dividing line seems faint. Such structure cannot only shield the human body in conformation but visually echoes with the Coal-Hopper-Unloading-Bridge at the wharf. Moreover, the building’s internal space can also represent a kind of primordial and tameless charm while the spatial dimension, large or small, and the as-cast-finish concrete surface with the seam among moulding boards and the bolt holes bring a sense of reality as well. The directness and simplicity resulting from this “literal” structure, material and space plus the sense of force or lightness because of large-scale overhanging style enables the overall building’s continuation of the industrial property of the original site, not only in time but in space."